The lavender arrived today from Purple Haze farm in Sequim, Washington, just in time for our lavender-planting celebration this weekend. We have ordered 350 baby plants to place into the area we have been lovingly amending with compost for the past few years. It has transformed from a solid mass of clay into soil which…


It’s an exciting day for us. We used to burn our wood, but with our concern for the quality of the air in San Benito County (and the rest of the world) we decided to chip our apricot prunings from last year and use them as ground cover. We are actively looking for ways to…


Oh, my gosh! The teeny, tiny tomato seedlings we planted have gotten so big! It’s fabulous to see all the flowers on them. That means a ton of tasty tomatoes in a few months. I can’t wait. I’m drooling thinking of them thinly sliced, layered in stacks with basil or cheese. We love to walk…


Cucumbers

I never ate cucumbers much as a child. My Mom didn’t like them. But now I really love them. As a crunchy addition to a sandwich, as a salad dressed with a good vinagrette, or thinly sliced and added to a pitcher of icy water (Try it! I swear it’s fabulous) they are wonderful. I…


What a glorious Saturday morning it was…lots of sunshine with enough chill in the soft breeze to keep active bodies cooled. Good thing, because under sunhats and sunscreen Kathleen and I were headed on behalf of San Benito Bounty for the 2009 Opening Day for the gleaning season, organized by Ag Against Hunger, an organization…


Chicken Little

At Quicksilver Farm, we have gotten Americauna Chickens. Though we usually go for the rarest breeds we can find, we wanted the Easter-like pastel eggs of the Aracauna, but could not deal with the genetic fault they have which causes ¼ of them to die. So we opted for the American-bred ones which have been…


At Quicksilver Farm, we do thermophilic composting, which is a biological process using microbes such as bacteria, fungi and actinomycetes. It is also an aerobic process, because the microbes take oxygen and carbon and through respiration create carbon dioxide, water, heat and compost. Since microbes like different levels of heat, the thrmophiles dominate at 110…


Today the temperature is in the high nineties, so it is unusually quiet around here. The cats and dogs are snoozing, and the sheep and goats are staying in the shade. I did call upon my darling husband, Tim, to put a load of compost out for me to work into a little corner of…


In the 1830s, David Douglas first identified the wild iris grown in the Central Coast of California, hence the name Iris douglasiana . But where could they have come from? And how did they get here? Asia and Europe have almost all of the nearly 300 recognized wild iris species. Only a couple dozen, all…